TEACHER MARK'S MUSIC ROOM

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BECOMING A BETTER MUSIC TEACHER ABRSM

Posted by [email protected] on June 15, 2019 at 7:40 AM

https://ugc.futurelearn.com/uploads/files/eb/46/eb460005-27c1-411b-a800-bb9ecf150c5f/I1-TLP-Let_s-Analyse-Your-Starting-Point.pdf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Coursework 1

from ABRSM course:BECOMING A BETTER MUSIC TEACHER


Let’s analyse your ‘starting point’

Having observed your own teaching, ask yourself to rate each of the following

questions out of 10, writing a sentence/paragraph (referencing your lesson-video)

in support of your awarded score:

Never

engaged

No progress/

pupil unaware

of goals

No

Fully

engaged

Significant

development/

pupil fully aware

of their goals

Yes

• How engaged was your pupil throughout the lesson?

Notice to what extent focus is maintained as the activities

change (e.g. playing, listening). Were there missed

opportunities to encourage their interest e.g. whilst they are

unpacking or packing away, whilst you are taking notes/

writing in their practice book?

• How would you rate your pupil’s progress and

their awareness of short and long term goals?

Whether aiming to develop an area of technique

or working towards a performance or exam, if pupils

understand what is required of them it can give

relevance to what they are learning, and this, in turn,

helps them to progress.

• Are you teaching as you would like to?

Consider if there is a match between your skill set and the

instruments and age-groups you are teaching. Take a moment

to reflect on the suitability of your hours and your teaching

environment. Is there the opportunity to pursue your musical

and teaching “philosophy”? If you are working for a school or

institution, do you feel supported in your work? Aim to address

any issues so that your teaching practice is worthwhile, healthy

and sustainable for the future.

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ABRSM Teacher Development

Teaching & Learning Principles

Over-focus on

one activity

Unrewarding

lesson for

your pupil

throughout

Unrewarding

lesson for you

throughout

Lesson paced

too quickly

or slowly

Good balance between

activities developing

the “whole” musician

Rewarding

lesson for

your pupil

throughout

Rewarding

lesson for

your pupil

throughout

Lesson

well-paced

throughout

• Was a there a good balance between lesson activities?

Focussing on small details is, of course, a part of

music-learning, however over-focus on one area can neglect the

whole musician in favour of a detail of repertoire or technique, and

it can affect motivation if your student’s progress is too slight to

demonstrate to themselves or others. Notice, in your lesson, if there

was further opportunity to bring in aspects of wider musicianship

towards the development of the whole musician, in addition to

keen focus on specific technique or repertoire detail.

• How rewarding was this lesson for your pupil?

To judge how rewarding the lesson is for your pupil you might

include reflection on their progress and engagement, but

also consider to what extent your teaching was encouraging,

adapted to your pupil’s learning style and their preferred

rate of learning. Do the lesson activities address your

student’s reasons for learning an instrument, the repertoire

they are drawn to and the activities they engage with most

enthusiastically?

• How rewarding was this lesson for you?

Teaching can be rewarding for many reasons, but it requires energy

and; despite this, if you can remain motivated and engaged, you

will, in turn, further inspire your pupil. Were there further chances,

in the lesson you observed, to develop the relationship with your

pupil, use your creativity and recognise what you have helped them

to achieve.

• Having watched your lesson, do you feel the pacing of the lesson

was appropriate to both the lesson activities and your pupil?

If the lesson felt rushed, notice if this compromised achievement

or understanding. Alternatively, you may be aware of wasted

time, or a pace which lacked momentum. Consider your pupil’s

reactions to your teaching pace, and the level of reinforcement at

which your student got the most from your lesson.

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Supporting the teaching and learning of music

in partnership with the Royal Schools of Music

Royal Academy of Music | Royal College of Music

Royal Northern College of Music | Royal Conservatoire of Scotland

www.abrsm.org  facebook.com/abrsm

@abrsm  ABRSM YouTube

Inappropriate and

unprofessional

impression made

No musical elements

in this lesson

No understanding

of practice

activities

Poor value

for money

Appropriate and

professional

impression made

Musical elements

throughout this lesson

Strong

understanding

of practice

activities

Excellent value

for money

• How appropriately do you come across?

Watching yourself back on video gives you the opportunity to

consider yourself as you appear to your pupil. Notice if your

explanations are clear, and worded appropriately to the age of the

student you are teaching. Consider, also, the impression created by

tone of voice, body language, and your appearance. Is the balance

of friendliness to professional authority achieved and appropriate to

a successful pupil-teacher relationship?

• How musical was this music lesson?

Were there satisfying musical moments of performance,

creativity and listening for your pupil as well as the development

of instrumental techniques and intellectual concepts such as

elements of the score?

• How well do you feel your pupil understood what was expected

of them at home – and how to achieve it - by the next lesson?

Notice to what extent you support your pupil in their practice at

home; it’s hard for a student to find the motivation to play their

instrument independently, particularly if they are not sure what

to do. Having given yourself a rating upon watching your lesson

back, be sure to compare your rating to the reality demonstrated

by your pupil in their next lesson.

• To what extent do you provide “value for money”

for your pupil and the parent/fee-payer?

You have had the chance to reflect - throughout these questions

- on aspects of your professionality and how they may affect your

reputation amongst current students and their parents/fee-payers;

this, in turn, influences potential future new-pupil recommendations.

Assess, also, whether your fee is appropriate; consider comparative

rates in your area, as well as valuing your experience and expertise.

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Categories: ABRSM

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